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The Great Crusade > Tutorials > Pinning Plastics


Title: Pinning Plastics
Description: How I do it


Yvraith - February 12, 2008 12:42 PM (GMT)
This may sound strange to a few people but this how I pin some of my plastic conversions, especially for greenstuff purposes.

1. mark parts for pin position.
2. Cut Pin/Paper clip etc. to approximate length.
3. Take a cigarette lighter and heat one end of pin piece (while holding with needle nose pliers)
4. Push pin into mini at desired point and angle.
5. Repeat steps 3 & 4 until pin is at required depth.
6. Once both sides are done, glue and admire your work.

The reason I do it this way is to ensure that the pin and it's hole are exactly the same size, and you don't have to worry about your drill bit being too big or too small.

Thoughts or Questions are welcome.

Weiss - February 12, 2008 12:49 PM (GMT)
Interesting technique. This could presumably be applied to hybrid models as well...

Gagoc TheAncient - February 12, 2008 02:20 PM (GMT)
When I pin plastics I use plastic rod. That way I can use plastic cement instead of Superglue to stick the pieces together.

Iacton - February 12, 2008 02:39 PM (GMT)
I use the gas hob! It is a bit quicker and the pin gets really hot really quick!

I also use superglue activator (from my work supply room, I work in the window industry - it's my company too so I won't sack myself!). This stuff is invaluable when you really don't want to sat for 10 minutes waiting for glue to take properly! Plus if you break a piece off whilst painting you can glue straight back on, spray it and be back painting within a couple of minutes without the fear of gluing all your brushes together.

ShroudFilm - February 12, 2008 07:59 PM (GMT)
I wonder who first thought up superglue activator?

"This instantly-bonding cyanoacrylate adhesive just isn't fast enough... we need it to harden before you even know you need to use it."

I've never thought about pinning plastics, TBH - I've always found gel poly cement to set like rock.

ProteanSun - February 12, 2008 09:10 PM (GMT)
I pin plastics the old fashioned way. I use a hobby drill and a piece of paperclip. I pin all plastic, marines, terminators, not tanks though as a lack of depth available.

I find pinning excellent to ensure an even coat and highlight on all parts, even those not easily visible. I use a surcical clamp (Imagine needle nose pliers that lock) so I can anchor the piece I am painting (one shaking hand is easier to paint with than two :P ).

Iacton - February 12, 2008 09:59 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (ShroudFilm @ Feb 12 2008, 07:59 PM)
I wonder who first thought up superglue activator?

"This instantly-bonding cyanoacrylate adhesive just isn't fast enough... we need it to harden before you even know you need to use it."

Touche.

It comes in rather useful when you are holding up 10 foot bit of plasticand don't want to use every appendage that evolution has furnished us with! ;)

It is much more useful doing plastic or resin onto metal where the drying time is a bit longer.

Vredesbyrd - February 12, 2008 10:13 PM (GMT)
It is indeed.

Plastic weld is also a God send for certain projects - like a Battle Company's worth of Rhinos....




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