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Save A Pound Dog QLD Website
 

 The Queensland Government is seeking community inp, Invitation to comment
Denise
Posted: Jul 6 2007, 09:01 PM


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Joined: 28-January 06



This document can be found at

http://www.dpi.qld.gov.au/cps/rde/xchg/dpi...25_ENA_HTML.htm

Queensland the Smart State
Managing unwanted
cats and dogs
Discussion paper
July 2007

Discussion paper
Queensland the Smart State
Managing unwanted
cats and dogs
July 2007
PR07–3012
Disclaimer
The issues raised in this Discussion Paper are intended for discussion. They do not represent
Government policy, nor do they represent the views of either Minister and do not commit the
Ministers to a particular direction for future action.
The materials presented in this publication are distributed by the Queensland Government as
an information source only. The State of Queensland (Department of Primary Industries and
Fisheries and Department of Local Government, Planning, Sport and Recreation) makes no
statements, representations, or warranties about the accuracy or completeness of, and you
should not rely on, any information contained in this publication. The Queensland
Government disclaims all responsibility and liability (including without limitation, liability in
negligence) for all expenses, losses, damages and costs you might incur as a result of the
information being inaccurate or incomplete in any way, and for any reason.
© The State of Queensland, Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, and Department
of Local Government, Planning, Sport and Recreation 2007.
Copyright protects this material. Except as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth),
reproduction by any means (photocopying, electronic, mechanical, recording or otherwise),
making available online, electronic transmission or other publication of this material is
prohibited without the prior written permission of the Department of Primary Industries and
Fisheries, Queensland.
Inquiries should be addressed to:
Intellectual Property and Commercialisation Unit
Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries
GPO Box 46
Brisbane Qld 4001
or
copyright@dpi.qld.gov.au
Tel: +61 7 3404 6999
Contents
Invitation to comment............................................................................................... 1
The context................................................................................................................ 2
Queensland’s approach to managing unwanted cats and dogs .......................... 3
Legislation ............................................................................................................... 3
Other initiatives ....................................................................................................... 4
What is the issue?..................................................................................................... 5
What is happening in other jurisdictions? ............................................................. 5
The four management tools..................................................................................... 7
Education ................................................................................................................ 7
Registration ............................................................................................................. 7
Identification............................................................................................................ 8
Desexing ................................................................................................................. 9
Implementation options.......................................................................................... 10
Maintain the current system.................................................................................. 10
Enhance the current system through non-compulsory measures......................... 10
Statewide voluntary registration, identification and desexing with incentives ....... 11
Statewide mandatory registration and identification, and voluntary desexing with
incentives .............................................................................................................. 11
Statewide mandatory registration, identification and desexing ............................. 12
Ensuring the system is working............................................................................ 13
Response form........................................................................................................ 15

Discussion paper only—not government policy
1
Invitation to comment
The Queensland Government is seeking community input on the issue of managing
unwanted cats and dogs. This discussion paper has been prepared by relevant
agencies within the Queensland Government as the first part of the process. It aims
to stimulate discussion and feedback on the key issues that need to be addressed
and identify possible solutions.
Interested stakeholders and community members are invited to make submissions in
response to this discussion paper using the response form on page 15.
Submissions may be aligned to the specific questions raised in this discussion paper,
or may address any matter that the state government should take into account when
developing a policy position with regard to managing unwanted cats and dogs.
This document and related material is available on the Department of Primary
Industries and Fisheries (DPI&F) website at www.dpi.qld.gov.au/animalwelfare
Hardcopy submissions should be sent by post or fax to the:
General Manager
Animal Welfare
Biosecurity Queensland
Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries
GPO Box 46
Brisbane Qld 4001
Fax:(07) 3239 3510
The closing date for submissions is Friday 3 August 2007 (by close of
business).
Further information
Mr Lawrence Gavey
Animal Welfare
Biosecurity Queensland
Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries
PO Box 102
Toowoomba Qld 4350
Tel: (07) 4688 1303
Fax: (07) 4688 1199
Discussion paper only—not government policy
2
The context
Companion animals are a highly valued and important part of our lives. Figures
suggest that the majority of Australian households have pets—3.1 million households
have a dog and 2.5 million households have a cat.1 Companion animals are credited
with improving our health and contributing to our way of life. The reported beneficial
effects include reduced stress, improved mental health and wellbeing, and improved
health in the elderly.2
Despite the value that cats and dogs have in our lives, there appears to be an
increasing level of unwanted cats and dogs in Queensland, which is evident in the
numbers of cats and dogs having to be euthanased each year (these are animals
received by shelters and welfare organisations for which homes cannot be found). In
2006, the Animal Welfare League of Queensland euthanased 19% of dogs and 42%
of cats received. Over the same period, the Queensland branch of the Royal Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) euthanased 43% of dogs and 67%
of cats received.
The number of cats and dogs being euthanased by welfare shelters and councils
indicates that there is an increasing level of unwanted cats and dogs in the
community. This could be addressed through more responsible animal ownership
and better management of stray, unwanted and feral animals.
This discussion paper explores the issues associated with unwanted cats and dogs,
and identifies possible solutions. There is no quick fix for this issue. It is also
acknowledged that there are at least three or four distinct environments in
Queensland that may require different solutions (i.e. cities, regional towns,
rural/remote regions). The Queensland Government is working with key stakeholders
to take the first step, and the purpose of this discussion paper is to collect feedback
on what needs to be done and how it should be done.
Cats
Unwanted cats appears to be of greater concern than the issue of unwanted dogs.
Between 2002 and 2006, the Queensland Animal Welfare League euthanased 9463
cats, or 43% of those received (21 871 received). Over the same period, the
Queensland branch of the RSPCA euthanased 44 173 of the 65 583 cats received
(67.35%).
There are three sub-populations of cats—owned, semi-owned (stray) and feral. The
relative contribution of each of these sub-populations to unwanted cats is not clearly
understood, as cats are not generally registered or identified in Queensland and
research in this area is limited.
Cats can have their first litter as young as four months of age, with the average size
of a litter being two to five kittens. Many owners don’t have their cats desexed before
this age and therefore have unwanted litters. This problem is made worse because
the female cat comes into heat again a few days after having kittens, which results in
1 Australian Bureau of Statistics, Household pets special feature. Australian Social Trends 1995,
Canberra: AGPS (Cat. no. 4102.0), 1995, pp. 168-71.
2 JA Serpell, ‘Beneficial effects of pet ownership on some aspects of human health’, J Roy Soc Med, vol.
84, 1991, pp, 717–20.
JM Siegal, ‘Stressful life events and the use of physician services among the elderly: the moderating
role of pet ownership’, J Pers Soc Psychol, vol. 58, 1990, pp. 1081–86.
Discussion paper only—not government policy
3
further litters. There is also some evidence to suggest that due to Queensland’s
warmer climate, the cat breeding season is longer, meaning a larger number of
kittens are born year-round in many areas.
Unwanted cats is of community concern, not only because of the numbers
euthanased each year, but also because the presence of cats that are not desexed
can lead to nuisance behaviour in the community, such as howling, marking of
territory with urine and fighting. Uncontrolled cats can also have a significant impact
on the environment by killing wildlife.
Dogs
The situation with dogs is quite different to that of cats. Only 20% of surrendered or stray dogs are euthanased according to Queensland Animal Welfare League figures (43% with the RSPCA, with most strays being reclaimed by their owners). There are, however, some particular breeds of dogs which are euthanased more than others—
homes for crossbred working/terrier type dogs are the most difficult to find.
How concerned are you about unwanted cats and dogs in your area?
What (if any) systems are in place in your area for managing unwanted cats
and dogs?
How effective do you think these systems have been?
Queensland’s approach to managing unwanted
cats and dogs
Legislation
Local government laws
Animal control matters are managed by local governments through local laws. These
local laws can include requirements for animal registration, identification or desexing.
It is not compulsory for local governments to put a local law in place.
Of the 157 Queensland local councils, 124 have a dog registration system in place,
with 11 of these also requiring cat registration. All 124 councils require identification
of registered animals. Using microchips, as one means of animal identification, is
only compulsory for declared dangerous dogs or where a permit is required to keep a
certain number of cats or dogs.
Desexing is required for declared dangerous dogs or where a permit is required,
because of the number of dogs or cats kept or the size of the premises on which they
are kept. Some local governments provide registration fee incentives for desexed
animals, where registration is required.
Some local governments have taken steps to reduce the levels of unwanted cats and
dogs. For example, the Toowoomba City Council introduced compulsory cat
registration in 2001 and offers a registration discount to owners of desexed cats and
dogs. Identification is mandatory and can be done through a microchip or a tag on a
Discussion paper only—not government policy
4
collar. Toowoomba City Council also offers financial incentives to have animals
desexed through desexing vouchers, and regularly operates a microchip clinic
providing a subsidised rate for inserting microchips into companion animals.
There is some flexibility in the way that animal control matters can be managed by
local governments. For example, the Local Government Act 1993 regulates certain
breeds of dog that are considered dangerous, such as pit bull terriers. These breeds
of dogs are prohibited from being imported into Australia under the Commonwealth’s
Customs (Prohibited Imports) Regulation 1956. Queensland’s restricted–dog breed
laws are therefore aligned with the Commonwealth’s requirements and apply
throughout the state. Councils are obliged to enforce these laws. Under this
legislation, local councils require the desexing of these restricted dog breeds.
Animal Care and Protection Act 2001
The Animal Care and Protection Act 2001 is administered by DPI&F and deals with
welfare matters associated with all animals, such as duty of care and cruelty. RSPCA
inspectors, in conjunction with DPI&F officers, enforce this legislation. This Act and
model codes of practice for the welfare of animals consider euthanasia as an
appropriate option for resolving animal welfare or animal management issues.
Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Regulation 2003
The Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Regulation 2003 classifies
feral cats and wild dogs as Class 2 declared pest animals. The feral cat is defined as
a cat that is not kept and fed by someone. The term wild dog refers collectively to
purebred dingoes, dingo hybrids and domestic dogs that have escaped or been
deliberately released.
As Class 2 pest animals, local governments and state land managers are required to
consider feral cats and wild dogs as an element in their pest management plans. The
objective of the plan should include levels of control to maintain the pest population
below levels at which they cause significant damage.
Other initiatives
The Queensland Government has adopted a number of educational initiatives to
support the legislative approaches to companion animal management. For instance,
DPI&F has developed the ‘Help an animal smile’ campaign and also develops
information packages regarding feral animal management.
The Department of Local Government, Planning, Sport and Recreation develops
model local laws for voluntary adoption by local governments. Model Law No. 4
(Keeping and Control of Animals) 2000 currently includes requirements for
registration of animals and identification requirements for registered animals,
including the use of microchips.
Animal welfare groups, such as the RSPCA and Animal Welfare League, play a
pivotal role in animal management and welfare. They develop comprehensive
educational programs, support animal management outcomes by accepting and
caring for surrendered and stray animals, and provide animal adoption services. For
example, the RSPCA has an Education Mobile Unit which provides a mobile
Discussion paper only—not government policy
5
classroom to deliver education on animal care, and the Animal Welfare League has
an education team that visits schools.
The Australian Veterinary Association also runs a Pets and People Education
Program, designed to educate children about responsibilities and issues associated
with pet ownership and interacting with animals.
What is the issue?
While there are many strategies in place to address the issue of unwanted cats and
dogs, and to encourage responsible pet ownership in Queensland, it appears further
action is required.
Firstly, there is a disparate approach to animal control by local councils. For example,
most councils require dogs to be registered but only some councils3 register cats.
Additionally, some councils limit the number of animals that can be kept or require a
permit to keep more than the limit.
Secondly, the educational material regarding companion animals is different for all
parties, with some inconsistent messages being distributed according to the policy of
the relevant organisation.
Finally, there is a lack of research into the most effective means of managing
unwanted cats and dogs.
Overall, there appears to be a lack of a coordinated and targeted approach to
managing unwanted cats and dogs. We need to look at ways of improving our
approach to achieve a real reduction in the number of cats and dogs being
euthanased each year.
What is happening in other jurisdictions?
A number of states and territories have implemented measures in an effort to
address companion animal management issues. The focus is primarily on
registration and identification, with some jurisdictions also requiring some degree of
desexing. Generally, there is greater attention given to dog management than cat
management.
3 Such as Toowoomba, Gladstone and Banana.
Discussion paper only—not government policy
6
Jurisdiction Legislation Scope
Victoria Domestic (Feral and
Nuisance) Animals Act
1994
All cats and dogs over three months of
age must be registered. They must be
identified with a tag when outside their
owner’s premises. Councils have also
been given the power to require
compulsory microchips for all cats and
dogs in their municipality. Cats and dogs
sold or given away from any pet shop,
breeder or pound must have a microchip
and be desexed. Councils have the power
to require compulsory desexing of cats
and dogs.
New South Wales Companion Animals Act
1998
Cat and dog owners must microchip their
animals and register them with their
council. A reduced fee for registration is
offered for desexed animals.
Australian Capital
Territory
Domestic Animals Act
2000
It is compulsory to register dogs over eight
weeks of age but not compulsory for cats.
All cat owners must identify their animals
either by microchip, collar and tag, tattoo
or a combination of all three. The
minimum requirement for a dog is to
display the dog registration tag.
Microchips may be used to provide
additional identification details. It is
compulsory to desex cats and dogs unless
a permit is obtained.
South Australia Dog and Cat Management
Act 1995
The Dog and Cat Management Board of
South Australia (established under the
Act) is the only statutory authority of its
kind in Australia. The Act provides powers
and functions for councils to manage dogs
and cats. All dogs and cats sold from a
pound or refuge must be desexed and
registered.
Tasmania Dog Control Act 2000 The Act provides for the control and
management of dogs and requires all
dogs over the age of six months to be
registered with the local council. Neither
microchips nor desexing are compulsory.
Tasmania does not have cat registration.
Northern Territory None No territory-wide animal management
legislation in place. Some councils, with
local laws in place, register dogs.
Western Australia Dog Act 1976 All dogs over the age of three months
must be registered with the local council.
Desexing of dogs is not compulsory.
There is no control of cats.
Discussion paper only—not government policy
7
The four management tools
There are four key tools that could be used to address the issue of unwanted cats
and dogs in Queensland:
• education
• registration
• identification
• desexing.
Education
Most people want to do the right thing by their animals and the community. However,
sometimes pet owners are not aware of their options, or have conflicting views about
the possible options. For example, some believe that it is better for the cat if they let it
have kittens, although there is no scientific evidence that this is true.
Many organisations have very good information available; however, its availability
may not be widespread or getting to the right people. Some information may even be
conflicting. Therefore, there is the potential for consistent educational material to be
developed regarding pet ownership, including benefits of registration, identification
and desexing.
It is worthwhile and less costly to have all parties—including government, local
councils, veterinary associations and animal welfare groups—agree on the
information to be distributed, and for the community to have access to that
information through all parties.
Successful implementation of any unwanted cat or dog management initiative will be
highly dependant on the supporting educational material. The community needs to
have better access to information about their rights and responsibilities in terms of
animal management.
What (if any) educational initiatives are used in your area to promote
responsible animal ownership?
How effective have these initiatives been?
Registration
Registration of animals provides a link between an animal and its owner by recording
the owner of the animal, in much the same way as car registration systems record
the owners of vehicles. Registration allows the authorities to reunite lost and stray
animals with their owners, and to enforce any restrictions or obligations on owners.
Registration fees in some areas may be used to help meet part of the costs of
providing these services to the community.
Registration is essential in any program to control companion animals, as it enables
animals to be reclaimed by their owner and authorities can make an informed
decision about whether an animal should be euthanased. Many animals are
Discussion paper only—not government policy
8
euthanased because the relevant authority has no capacity to identify and contact an
owner.
In Queensland, it is optional for councils to have dog or cat registration. Many local
councils have adopted dog registration; however, only a few councils (such as
Toowoomba) have a cat registration system.
In order to optimise the effectiveness of a registration system, there needs to be
information sharing between authorities. At the moment, dog registration information
is not shared. This means that dogs can be moved from one council area to another
with no record of the dog’s history. It may therefore be beneficial to have a reciprocal
registration scheme or a statewide registration database.
What (if any) dog or cat registration services are available in your area?
How effective have these services been?
How supportive are you of a statewide animal registration system for cats and
dogs?
Identification
Identification of an animal goes hand in hand with its registration. This ensures that
the animal can be identified and returned to the owner as soon as it is found, thereby
protecting the animal from being euthanased. Identification also enables authorities
to distinguish between owned and unowned animals, and deal with stray animal
nuisance issues.
The two forms of identification most used are collar tags and microchips.
Collar tags are visible from a distance, making it easy to determine that the animal is
owned. However they can be lost, become unreadable and can be moved from one
animal to another.
Microchips (small capsules) are implanted under the skin of the animal. The
microchip has a unique number which can be read by a special electronic reader.
Microchips normally last the lifetime of the animal and cannot be easily transferred
between animals. Close proximity to the animal is needed to read the microchip.
Microchip implantation is generally performed by a veterinarian or an authorised
organisation. It is a safe and almost painless procedure. The great majority of
veterinary surgeons, councils and animal rescue organisations have microchip
readers. There are optional national databases for microchips, which help reunite lost
animals with their owners.
Currently, all councils with mandatory registration require animals to be identified,
usually by wearing registration tags. Microchips may be recognised by these councils
but they are not compulsory.
Discussion paper only—not government policy
9
What (if any) identification methods are available in your area?
How effective have these methods been?
How supportive are you of using microchips as a method of identification?
Desexing
One way of dealing with unwanted cats and dogs is to have animals desexed. This
reduces the number of unwanted animals being born.
Desexing involves an operation under anaesthetic performed by a veterinary
surgeon. Male animals are castrated and females have their ovaries and uterus
removed. Currently the cost of desexing dogs is around $160 for a male dog, $230
for a female dog, $80 for a male cat and $140 for a female cat.
Although the cost of the surgery may seem high, it is much less than the cost of
raising a litter of puppies or kittens. Many organisations have programs available
through which desexing can be accessed at a reduced fee. Nevertheless, desexing
of an animal should be considered to be a part of a pet’s general expenses, along
with food, veterinary care and shelter.
Cats and dogs can be desexed from eight weeks of age, although some
veterinarians believe that it benefits the animal to wait until it is older. The Animal
Welfare League and RSPCA, however, advocate early age desexing and believe that
there is no strong evidence that early age desexing poses significant risks to the
animal.
There are additional benefits to desexing. Desexed animals are less likely to be
aggressive, mark territory, be prone to wandering or to develop certain types of
cancers. There is no scientific evidence to suggest that desexing will result in an
animal being lazier, lose their personality, experience ongoing pain or suffer by not
being able to have a litter.
There have, however, been concerns raised about the effectiveness of compulsory
desexing in reducing the number of unwanted dogs and cats. There is currently no
consistent research in Australia that can demonstrate the effectiveness of
compulsory desexing; however, international research indicates that such
approaches have not had a great impact on the number of animals, due to problems
with enforcement. Compulsory desexing would generally target owned animals, as it
would be difficult to apply such an approach to stray or feral animals. Therefore,
some research may be required to assess the likely impact of this management tool.
Regardless of the option adopted for reducing the number of unwanted companion
animals, it is considered that any desexing requirement needs to be linked with
registration and identification. This ensures that desexing records can be kept with
registration and identification information, therefore negating the need to determine
whether an animal is desexed by visual inspection—which can be extremely difficult
in female animals.
How supportive are you of compulsory animal desexing?
Discussion paper only—not government policy
10
Implementation options
There are five options to achieve a reduction in the number of unwanted cats and
dogs (using the management tools):
1. maintain the current system
2. enhance the current system through-non compulsory measures
3. statewide voluntary registration, identification and desexing with incentives
4. statewide mandatory registration and identification, and voluntary desexing with
incentives
5. statewide mandatory registration, identification and desexing.
Maintain the current system
Under the current system, education is the central approach to companion animal
management. DPI&F has a comprehensive educational program regarding animal
welfare, and community groups also develop educational materials for use by the
public.
Individual local councils also have the choice of whether they put in place an animal
control system. Councils can impose mandatory registration, identification and
desexing requirements to meet the local circumstances. The current system does not
impose any obligation on them to do so.
How supportive are you of the current Queensland system of managing
unwanted cats and dogs being maintained?
Enhance the current system through non-compulsory
measures
The four management tools could be applied in a non-compulsory way to impact on
the number of unwanted animals.
The first tool, education, could be improved by packaging educational materials
developed by the relevant government and community parties for dissemination
across the state. The use of incentives for desexing animals could also be increased.
The current system may also be improved through the modification of model local
laws for voluntary use by local councils. Model Local Law No.4 (Keeping and Control
of Animals) is silent on the issue of desexing, but could be modified to specifically
include desexing as an adjunct to animal registration. This would give local councils a
guide as to what they can adopt, should they wish to do so.
How supportive are you of enhancements to the current system through the
modification of model local government laws?
How supportive are you of enhancements to the current system through a
coordinated communication campaign?
Discussion paper only—not government policy
11
Statewide voluntary registration, identification and desexing
with incentives
While local authorities can adopt registration and identification systems, not all have
done so. One approach could be to require all local authorities to have a registration
and identification system in place for voluntary use by the community. Alternatively, a
state-based system could be developed for this purpose.
Participation in the voluntary system could be encouraged through an incentive
system, such as discount vouchers for use in the community or subsidised desexing
in partnership with veterinarians.
This option would have no enforcement burden associated with it for authorities;
however, it may only capture responsible animal owners.
How supportive are you of statewide voluntary registration, identification and
desexing with incentives?
What (if any) incentives are available in your area?
How effective do you think these incentives are?
Are there any incentives that would encourage you to have your animal
desexed?
Statewide mandatory registration and identification, and
voluntary desexing with incentives
In addition to the possible voluntary or incentive-based solutions to the unwanted
cats and dogs issue, there are mandatory options (incorporating the four
management tools) to be considered.
A statewide system requiring mandatory registration and identification could be
implemented, supported by an incentive-based voluntary desexing program.
Incentives could include lower registration costs for desexed animals or vouchers for
desexing to be done through veterinarians. Since adopting a system of mandatory
registration, Toowoomba City Council has seen an increase in the number of cats
being returned to their owners, from 1% to 25%.
The system could be mandated by state legislation and build on the existing local
council systems for animal registration. This would see local authorities enforcing the
state legislation at the community level. Alternatively, a state government system of
registration that is enforced by the state could be developed.
Any mandatory approach would be complemented by consistent educational
initiatives across the state. Under this option, the educational initiatives would also
promote the benefits of voluntary desexing.
The implementation of any mandatory system would, however, need to take animal
welfare issues into consideration. A mandatory system places a burden on the
community to comply, including a financial burden in this case. This may give rise to
animal cruelty or abandonment, if owners are unwilling to meet these conditions.
Discussion paper only—not government policy
12
How supportive are you of statewide mandatory registration and identification,
and voluntary desexing with incentives?
Statewide mandatory registration, identification and desexing
The next step in a mandatory system would be to mandate desexing of animals
along with registration and identification. Such a system could be further supported
through reduced fees for registration of desexed animals.
Mandatory desexing could apply to all animals, reducing the number of animals that
are able to breed and therefore leading to reduced population levels.
One variation on this mandatory desexing proposal is to only require animals to be
desexed when they are sold or given away. That is, the requirement would not apply
to animals that are already owned. The immediate impact of this may not be readily
apparent; however, it should have an impact on the animal population in the long
term.
A compulsory approach to desexing would, however, need to take into account
legitimate exemptions. Breeding of animals, whether purebred or crossbred, is
necessary to maintain the supply of pets and to support the valuable contribution
they make to our community, and to ensure that genetic diversity is maintained in the
population.
Allowance for animals that are recognised under accredited organisations for
showing may also need to be considered. Furthermore, consideration may need to
be given to exemption for working animals, such as farm dogs.
The likely effectiveness of a mandatory desexing program needs to be investigated
further. There is a lack of agreement and research on the extent to which unowned
and feral cats contribute to the number of cats being handed in to animal refuges and
being euthanased. If unowned cats contribute significantly to the overall numbers of
unwanted cats, the desexing of owned cats may have limited overall impact.
The Australian Capital Territory has introduced a form of compulsory desexing but
this has not been shown to reduce the cat population, although any impacts may take
years to show. There is currently no consistent research in Australia that can
demonstrate the effectiveness of compulsory desexing. However, international
research (particularly in the United States) indicates that mandatory desexing of cats
is not effective due to ongoing issues with enforcement and other legal mechanisms.
It is possible, however, that linking desexing with education, registration and
identification in a coordinated manner will have a real impact.
Any mandatory system needs to be enforced in order to be effective. It also needs to
be supported with a comprehensive educational program. All of these requirements
are resource intensive.
Discussion paper only—not government policy
13
How supportive are you of statewide mandatory registration, identification and
desexing to address the unwanted cat and dog issue?
Can you suggest other potential solutions to the unwanted cat and dog issue?
Which system of animal control would you prefer in Queensland?
Ensuring the system is working
Any program aimed at dealing with managing unwanted cats and dogs needs to be
monitored to ensure it is working. It is proposed that a Queensland Companion
Animal Management Group, including members from key stakeholder organisations,
oversee the implementation of any response to the problem and suggest refinements
where necessary.
Ongoing research will also be needed to support any program implemented. To gain
a fuller understanding of the issues involved for Queensland, research could be
undertaken by a recognised centre of animal research. This research would inform
policy development and the likely effectiveness of possible control methods.
Discussion paper only—not government policy
14
Discussion paper only—not government policy
15
Response form
Managing unwanted cats and dogs
1. What is your postcode? ___________
2. Do you live in a (please circle):
• city
• regional town
• rural/remote community?
The context
3. How concerned are you about unwanted cats and dogs in your area? (Please
circle.)
1 Not concerned
2 Slightly concerned
3 No opinion
4 Concerned
5 Very concerned
4. (a) What (if any) systems are in place in your area for managing unwanted cats
and dogs?
(cool.gif How effective do you think these systems have been? (Please circle.)
1 Not effective
2 Slightly effective
3 No opinion
4 Effective
5 Very effective
Discussion paper only—not government policy
16
Education
5. (a) What (if any) educational initiatives are used in your area to promote
responsible animal ownership?
(cool.gif How effective have these initiatives been? (Please circle.)
1 Not effective
2 Slightly effective
3 No opinion
4 Effective
5 Very effective
Comments:
Registration
6. (a) What (if any) registration services are available in your area?
(cool.gif How effective have these services been? (Please circle.)
1 Not effective
2 Slightly effective
3 No opinion
4 Effective
5 Very effective
7. How supportive are you of a statewide animal registration system for cats and
dogs? (Please circle.)
1 Not supportive
2 Slightly supportive
3 No opinion
4 Supportive
5 Very supportive
Discussion paper only—not government policy
17
Identification
8. (a) What methods are used to identify cats and dogs in your area (e.g. council
registration, microchips, collars and tags, ear marking)?
(cool.gif How effective have these services been? (Please circle.)
1 Not effective
2 Slightly effective
3 No opinion
4 Effective
5 Very effective
9. How supportive are you of using microchips as a method of identification?
(Please circle.)
1 Not supportive
2 Slightly supportive
3 No opinion
4 Supportive
5 Very supportive
Desexing
10. How supportive are you of compulsory animal desexing? (Please circle.)
1 Not supportive
2 Slightly supportive
3 No opinion
4 Supportive
5 Very supportive
Comments:
Discussion paper only—not government policy
18
Maintain the current system
11. How supportive are you of the current Queensland system of managing unwanted
cats and dogs being maintained? (Please circle.)
1 Not supportive
2 Slightly supportive
3 No opinion
4 Supportive
5 Very supportive
Comments:
Enhance the current system through non-compulsory measures
12. How supportive are you of enhancements to the current system through the
modification of model local government laws? (Please circle.)
1 Not supportive
2 Slightly supportive
3 No opinion
4 Supportive
5 Very supportive
Comments:
Discussion paper only—not government policy
19
13. How supportive are you of enhancements to the current system through a
coordinated communication campaign? (Please circle.)
1 Not supportive
2 Slightly supportive
3 No opinion
4 Supportive
5 Very supportive
Comments:
Statewide voluntary registration, identification and desexing with
incentives
14. How supportive are you of statewide voluntary registration, identification and
desexing with incentives? (Please circle.)
1 Not supportive
2 Slightly supportive
3 No opinion
4 Supportive
5 Very supportive
15. (a) What (if any) incentives to register, identify and desex are available in your
area?
(cool.gif How effective do you think these incentives are? (Please circle.)
1 Not effective
2 Slightly effective
3 No opinion
4 Effective
5 Very effective
Discussion paper only—not government policy
20
16. Are there any incentives that would encourage you to have your animal desexed?
Comments:
Statewide mandatory registration and identification, and voluntary
desexing with incentives
17. How supportive are you of statewide mandatory registration and identification,
and voluntary desexing with incentives? (Please circle.)
1 Not supportive
2 Slightly supportive
3 No opinion
4 Supportive
5 Very supportive
Comments:
Statewide mandatory registration and identification and desexing
18. How supportive are you of statewide mandatory registration, identification and
desexing to address the unwanted cat and dog issue? (Please circle.)
1 Not supportive
2 Slightly supportive
3 No opinion
4 Supportive
5 Very supportive
Comments:
Discussion paper only—not government policy
21
19. Can you suggest other potential solutions to the unwanted cat and dog issue?
20. Which system of animal control would you prefer in Queensland? (Please circle.)
1 Maintain the current system
2 Enhance the current system through modification of model local laws
and a coordinated communication campaign
3 Statewide voluntary registration, identification and desexing with
incentives
4 Statewide mandatory registration and identification, and voluntary
desexing with incentives
5 Statewide mandatory registration, identification and desexing
PR07–3012
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Maddy
Posted: Jul 8 2007, 02:19 PM


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I think we all need to give our opinions to the submission.

Nothing was mentioned about pet shops which is a pity as I believe a lot of the problem lays in impulse buying. Plus many pet shops give incorrect information about the dogs people are buying.

Compulsory desexing is good but I believe there should be some exceptions. I'd agree to getting permission to forgo desexing under certain circumstances which are strongly policed.

That brings me to another problem. How are these new rules going to be policed? Is the govt going to give councils etc more money for more staff?

Thanks for the link Denise. I'll have to give it a lot more thought.
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Marie
Posted: Jul 8 2007, 02:33 PM


one foot in the grave dawg...
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I totally agree about how sales outlets like petshops have not been mentioned.
I can't see how the numbers of dogs being dumped can be significantly changed without
also having legislation which covers the breeding & sale of dogs (the UK has....tho' there'd be no
need to copy it).

It's very important to get submissions in...something has to be done to stem the flood of thousands of dogs into pounds & shelters (where finally a lot of dogs get put down.)
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Denise
Posted: Jul 9 2007, 10:37 AM


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Group: Site owner
Posts: 185
Member No.: 3
Joined: 28-January 06



Maddy, Marie section 12 states:


QUOTE
How supportive are you of statewide mandatory registration and identification,
and voluntary desexing with incentives?
Statewide mandatory registration, identification and desexing
The next step in a mandatory system would be to mandate desexing of animals
along with registration and identification. Such a system could be further supported
through reduced fees for registration of desexed animals.
Mandatory desexing could apply to all animals, reducing the number of animals that are able to breed and therefore leading to reduced population levels.

One variation on this mandatory desexing proposal is to only require animals to be
desexed when they are sold or given away. That is, the requirement would not apply to animals that are already owned. The immediate impact of this may not be readily apparent; however, it should have an impact on the animal population in the long term.


I may be wrong but I take this part of the discussion as being any amimal that is given away or sold either through a petshop or newspaper MUST be desexed before being offered for sale.
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Maddy
Posted: Jul 9 2007, 02:54 PM


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That is the rule in NSW.
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missmyrose
  Posted: Jul 10 2007, 09:46 AM


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Group: Members
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Member No.: 63
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biggrin.gif Hi, Well I am trying to get into the site to fill in the paper work, having a little trouble. Page wont' open. I will continue to try untill I get in. I hope everyone who enters this wonderful web site will take a few minutes of there time to fill it out also. It is very important for everyone to do it, as it will have a large impact on the current problem. So go on! now is YOUR chance to do something big which will take up a small amount of your time! Keep up the great work Denise and CO......... thumbup.gif Kisskiss to all those beutiful lil fury guys waiting to be love_hearts.gifd forever! catdog.gif
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Denise
Posted: Jul 10 2007, 10:57 AM


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Group: Site owner
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Joined: 28-January 06



I have added a direct link to the Discussion paper from the Government on the home page of our web site.

Let me know if you are still having problems

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