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 Revolvers
IronVinyl
Posted: May 7 2011, 11:24 PM


Administrator


Group: Resistance Commander
Posts: 155
Member No.: 1
Joined: 10-October 10



Landmarks in Revolver history

Pepperbox (circa 1790)
The Pepperbox is the first form of the revolver. Pepperboxes featured a full barrel for every chamber. Early pepperboxes featured as few as two or three barrels, and were manually rotated. Contrary to popular belief, Pepperboxes only fired one shot at a time. Multiple barrel weapons that fired all at once are called Volley Guns.

Paterson Colt (1836)
Designed by Samuel Colt in the city of Paterson, New Jersey, the Paterson Colt is the first successful firearm to fit the modern definition of a revolver, involving multiple rotating chambers and a single barrel.

Colt Peacemaker (1873)
The Colt Peacemaker was the first commercially successful handgun to use metallic cartridges. It was adopted as the US Army service revolver in 1873, where it served until 1892. The .45 Colt round used by the Peacemaker was, for years, the most powerful cartridge in the world.

Smith & Wesson Schofield (1875)
The Schofield, direct decendant of the failed S&W Model No. 3, Was the first commercially successful top break revolver.

Colt M1892 (1892)
The Colt model 1892 was the first Double Action revolver issued by the U.s. Military. Despite its impressive mechanical performance, the .38 caliber cartridge it used was disliked due to its insufficient performance during the Phillipine Insurrections. This lead to US sidearms using a .45 caliber round from 1909 to 1982.

Nagant M1895 (1895)
Designed in 1895 by Belgian industrialist Leon Nagant, the Nagant revolver is notable primarily for being the only revolver ever to feature a gas seal system. On a trigger pull, the cylinder was pushed forward against the forcing cone, and combined with the unique cartridge, created a gas seal, improving muzzle velocity. This also led to a very heavy trigger pull.

Webley-Fosbery (1901)
Alright, seriously, wat? The Webley-Fosbery is an autorevolver. That means that the recoil impulse from each shot would cause the upper half of the frame to move back on the lower, cocking the hammer. The Webley-Fosbery had a single action trigger, meaning it had to be cocked for the first shot.

Colt Python (1955)
The Colt Python is generally considered a pinnacle of the modern revolver. It is renowned for it's smooth trigger, accuracy, and aesthetics.

Smith & Wesson Model 29 (1955)
The Model 29 is the most commerically successful .44 Magnum of all time. It was incredibly popular from its introduction, but became even more so after being prominently featured in The Dirty Harry films and in Taxi Driver.

Mateba Unica 6 (1997)
The Mateba improved upon the autorevolver concept introduced by the Webley-Fosbery, and also introduced the six o'clock barrel. Aligning the barrel with the lowest chamber in the cylinder significantly reduced felt recoil. Despite its quality, the Unica 6 was never a commercial success, especially outside of Italy.

Chiappa Rhino (2009)
Designed by the same designer as the Unica 6, the Rhino shares the Mateba's six o'clock barrel design, but has achieved much greater success. Unlike the Unica, the Rhino is not an autorevolver.


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IronVinyl
Posted: May 12 2011, 12:48 AM


Administrator


Group: Resistance Commander
Posts: 155
Member No.: 1
Joined: 10-October 10



Popular Revolver Cartridges

.32 S&W Long: A lengthened version of .32 S&W, this cartridge was popular in its day for effective performance and low recoil. In modern times, it's appeal is primarily to owners of Nagant 1895 revolvers, as it will chamber and fire for much cheaper than the 7.62 Nagant cartridge.

.38 Special: Descended from the .38 Colt Long cartridge, .38 Special actually fires a .357" diameter bullet. In modern revolvers, .38 Special can be loaded to much higher pressures (+P) than it used to, allowing it to remain a powerful, viable choice today.

.357 Magnum: The most popular revolver cartridge in the world today. .357 Magnum is basically a longer .38 Special, meaning that .357 revolvers can chamber and fire .38 Special for reduced cost and recoil.

.44 Special: Descended from .44 American. Actually fires a .429" diameter bullet.

.44 Magnum: Like the .357, .44 Magnum is a lengthened .44 Special. .44 Magnum is considered a suitable round for hunting large game such as deer and elk. .44 Magnum revolvers can chamber and fire .44 Special.

.32 H&R Magnum: Based on a longer .32 S&W Long, .32 H&R provides power acceptable by modern standards in a .32 caliber round.

.327 Federal Magnum: A longer .32 H&R, the .327 is designed to provide comparable ballistics to .357, while allowing for higher capacity in the same size gun. Most .327 guns hold 7 rounds in a revolver the size of a 6 shot .357. .327 guns can chamber and fire .32 H&R, .32 S&W Long, and .32 S&W.

.45 Colt: At the time of its introduction, the most powerful handgun cartridge in the world. Still powerful by modern standards. New revolvers can handle much hotter loads than old ones.

.45 Schofield: Basically a shorter .45 Colt. Will chamber and fire in .45 Colt guns.

.454 Casull: Based on the .45 Colt cartridge, .454 outdoes .44 in terms of power, but at the cost of capacity. Due to its high case pressures, most .454 revolvers only hold 5 rounds.

.460 S&W Magnum: The highest velocity handgun cartridge in the world. Based on a lengthened .454, and as such, can chamber and fire .454 and .45 Colt.

.500 S&W Magnum: The most powerful handgun cartridge in the world. Also chambers and fires .500 S&W Special, which was in fact created after the Magnum.


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