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Harry Potter New Age > Library > A-Z books of Spells


Title: A-Z books of Spells
Description: Studens can look here for spells.


Mr.Kitahori - January 4, 2008 12:59 AM (GMT)

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Accio (The Summoning Charm)
Pronunciation: Three variant pronunciations: AH-see-oh /a'sio/ (modern English) or AH-kee-oh /a'kio/ (classical Latin) or AK-see-oh /ak'sio (from the movie/game/audiobook).
Description: This charm summons an object to the caster. It can be used in two ways: by casting the charm, and naming the object desired ("Accio Firebolt"), or by pointing the wand at the desired object during or immediately following the incantation to "pull" it towards you.
Seen/Mentioned: Many places. Mentioned when Mrs Weasley summoned all the trick sweets from the Weasley twins. Seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, when Harry Potter used the charm to summon his broom to him during the first task of the Triwizard Tournament. Also tried (unsuccessfully) in "Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince" by Harry to retrieve a horcrux.
Etymology: The Latin accio means "I call" or "I summon".

Aguamenti (Aguamenti Charm)
Pronunciation: ah-gwa-MEN-tee /agwəmɛn'ti/
Description: It produces a jet of water from the witch or wizard's wand.
Seen/Mentioned: Probably used by Mrs Weasley in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince when she fills up the kettle with soup rather quickly. It is also used by Fleur Delacour in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire to put out her skirt which is on fire during her challenge against a dragon. Harry uses it twice in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, once in an attempt to give Dumbledore a drink to lessen the effects of Voldemort's potion, and once to douse Hagrid's hut after it was set on fire by a Death Eater.
Etymology: Possibly an extension of Portuguese/Spanish words agua ("water") and mente ("mind").
Notes: A spell like this is seen in the Goblet of Fire video game, used for extinguishing salamanders and small fires, under the name of Aqua Eructo.

Alohomora
Pronunciation: a-LOW-ha-MORE-ah /əlo'ho'moɹə/
Description: Used to open and unlock doors.
Seen/Mentioned: Used throughout the series, its first use was by Hermione Granger in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone on the third floor corridor door in Hogwarts (behind which was Fluffy).
Etymology: From Hawaiian aloha, meaning "farewell", and Latin mora, meaning "obstacle". Or perhaps an abbreviated form of the dog Latin sentence "alo hoc mora" intended to mean "I raise this barrier".
Notes: The spell may have some sort of unknown complex interaction with the Colloportus spell.

Anapneo
Pronunciation: ahn-AHP-nee-oh /an'ɑpneo/
Description: Clears the target's airway, if blocked.
Seen/Mentioned: Professor Slughorn cast this on Marcus Belby when the latter began to choke after swallowing too fast while attempting to respond to a question in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.
Etymology: From the Greek verb anapneo (αναπνεω), "I breathe in". Compare apnea.
Notes: Anapneo and Episkey, which are first used in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, are the only spells in the series obviously derived from Greek. It is not out of the question that they are J. K. Rowling's acknowledgement to the unknown author of a fake Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix novel, who made extensive use of spells whose etymology is non-Latin, including Greek and even Japanese.

Aparecium
Pronunciation: a-pa-REE-see-um (/pəɹi'siʊm/)
Description: This spell makes invisible ink and perhaps invisible items in general appear.
Seen/Mentioned: First used in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, when Hermione Granger tries to make something appear in Tom Riddle's diary.
Etymology: The Latin apparre means "to appear". It is unclear where the end of the word (-ecium) comes from. The word "paramecium" is a New Latin word for a genus of bacteria; the segment -mecium here appears to be derived from the Greek mekes (μεκης), "length". In addition, -ium and -cium are not uncommon as Latin noun endings. It is probable that Rowling simply intended a meaningless mock-Latin ending.
Notes: See also Specialis Revelio.

Arresto Momentum
Pronunciation: ar-RES-to mo-MEN-tum
Description: This spell slows down a target.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Dumbledore in the Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban movie, when Harry falls off his broomstick during the quidditch game, in order to slow his fall.
Notes: Whether Arresto Momentum is canonical is currently disputed.

Avada Kedavra (The Killing Curse)
See The Unforgivable Curses in the world of Harry Potter for more detailed information.
Pronunciation: a-VAH-da ka-DA-vra /əvɑdə kida'vɹʊ/ or A-va-da keh-DAV-ra
Description: One of the three "Unforgivable Curses". Causes instant death, and leaves no physical signs of cause of death. This spell produces a jet or flash of green light, and a sound of some huge invisible thing rushing at the target.
Seen/Mentioned: Many places; is the curse that Voldemort used to kill Harry's parents. Seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Barty Crouch Jr. (impersonating Alastor "Mad-Eye" Moody) used it on a spider-like creature as a "class demonstration".
Etymology: The Aramaic avada means "I destroy/kill" whereas kedavra means "as I speak". Ergo Avada Kedavra: "I destroy as I speak". (The Aramaic "abara kedavra" means "I will create as I speak", compare non-Harry Potter Abracadabra).

Avis
Pronunciation: AH-vis /a'vɪs/
Description: The charm creates a flock of birds which pour forth from the caster's wand.
Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by Mr Ollivander to test Viktor Krum's wand. May also been used by Hermione, in Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince, when conjuring golden canaries in Transfiguration class.
Etymology: The Latin avis means "bird".

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Babbling Curse
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Causes the victim to babble nonsense.
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Backfiring Jinx
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Causes an object or spell to backfire into the opponent.

(The Banishing Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: The opposite of the Summoning Charm. It causes the targeted object to be thrown away from the caster, but it requires good aim.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by students in a charms lesson in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Possibly used by Professor Snape to banish Harry's wand in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.
Notes: The students in the Charms lesson used it as they talked with each other; it is possible the spell is non-verbal.
Notes (2): See Waddiwasi.

(Bat-Bogey Hex)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Causes "bogies" (British slang for dried nasal mucus, also known as "boogers" in the US) to turn into bats and attack the victim.
Seen/Mentioned: Particularly in reference to Ginny Weasley, who uses it on Draco Malfoy in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix and on Zacharias Smith in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.
Notes: This may also be the "Curse of the Bogies" mentioned by Ron in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone as a potential punishment should either Hermione Granger or Neville Longbottom get him and Harry in trouble. However, "bogy" also means a monster or a spectre, so it might simply be referring to that.

(Bubble-Head Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Puts a large bubble of air around the head of the user. Used as a magical equivalent of a breathing set.
Seen/Mentioned: Cedric Diggory and Fleur Delacour used this underwater in the second task of the Triwizard Tournament in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. It was also used by many Hogwarts students when walking through the hallways in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, because of the bad smells caused by the various pranks played on Dolores Umbridge.
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Cheering Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Causes the person whom the spell was cast upon to become happy and contented, though heavy-handedness with the spell may cause the person to break into an uncontrollable laughing fit.
Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.
Notes: Invented by Felix Summerbee.

Colloportus
Pronunciation: coll-oh-PORT-us /ka, lopoɹ'təs/
Description: This spell will magically lock a door, preventing it from being opened for a (presumably) limited amount of time.
Seen/Mentioned: First used in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix when Neville, Luna and Harry needed to seal doors in the Department of Mysteries against some Death Eaters.
Etymology: Perhaps a portmanteau of the Latin words colligere ("gather" or "collect") and porta ("door" or "gate"). The Greek root kolla also means "glue", and becomes collo- in many English words. Notably, the spell causes a door to seal itself "with an odd squelching noise".
Notes: The Death Eaters opened the door with Alohomora.

Colour-Change Charm
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Changes an object's colour.

Concealment Charm
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Used to conceal something.

(Confundus Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown.
Description: The Confundus Charm is a confusion spell.
Seen/Mentioned: First mentioned in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, when Professor Snape suggests that Harry and Hermione have been Confunded so that they will believe Sirius Black's claim to innocence. In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, it is suggested that the Confundus is the charm responsible for the Goblet choosing a fourth Triwizard contestant. It is first seen in action when Hermione Granger uses it on Cormac McLaggen during Quidditch tryouts in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. The spell causes McLaggen to fail to stop the fifth and final goal, causing Ron Weasley, who did block all five goals, to get the Keeper spot on the Gryffindor Quidditch team.
Etymology: Regardless of the actual incantation, the word "Confundus" appears to be derived from the Latin confundere, "confuse;perplex".

(Conjunctivitus Curse)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: A curse that affects the victim's eyesight and vision.
Seen/Mentioned: Suggested by Sirius Black in the letter he sent Harry and used by Viktor Krum for the first task of the Triwizard Tournament in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Also used by Madame Maxime in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix on giants.
Notes: Presumably, the common name derived from the disease of that name, more commonly known as "pink eye" or "caterpillar eye" due to its scabby inflammation.

Crucio (The Cruciatus Curse)
See The Unforgivable Curses in the world of Harry Potter for more detailed information.
Pronunciation: CRU-see-oh /kru'sio/ (classical Latin: CRU-kee-oh /kru'kio/)
Description: Inflicts great pain on the recipient of the curse. One of the three "Unforgivable Curses".
Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Barty Crouch Jr., who was impersonating ex-Auror Alastor "Mad-Eye" Moody, used it on a spider-like creature as a "class demonstration" in a Defence Against the Dark Arts lecture. Later in the book it is discovered that Barty Crouch Jr., Bellatrix Lestrange, Rodolphus Lestrange, and Rabastan Lestrange were sent to the wizard prison, Azkaban, for using the curse to torture Frank and Alice Longbottom, parents of Neville Longbottom, into insanity.
Etymology: Latin crucio, "I torture" (perfect passive participle cruciatus).

Curse of the Bogies
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Unknown

Cushioning Charm
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Creates an invisible cushioned area. Used primarily in broomstick manufacturing.

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Daydream Charm
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Gives the spell caster a highly-realistic 30 minute daydream. Invented by Fred and George Weasley.

Deletrius
Pronunciation: de-LEET-ree-us /dəli'tɹiʊs/
Description: An erasure spell. It erases images and magical "after-effects".
Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Amos Diggory gets rid of the echo of the Dark Mark from Harry's wand.
Etymology: The Latin delre means "to erase".

Densaugeo
Pronunciation: denz-OW-gay-oh /dɛnzau'geo/ or den-SAW-jee-oh
Description: This charm makes the victim's teeth grow rapidly.
Seen/Mentioned: Introduced in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Draco Malfoy attacks Hermione outside of the Potions classroom.
Etymology: From Latin dens, "tooth", and augeo, "I increase" or "I enlarge".

Diffindo (The Severing Charm)
Pronunciation: dif-FIN-doh /dɪfɪ'ndo/
Description: Tears the target, or a specific area on the target.
Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Harry urgently wants to talk to Cedric Diggory he casts this spell to rip his bag, delaying him for class. Harry also uses it in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix in an attempt to save Ron from the brains in the Department of Mysteries, and in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince when he wants to switch the cover of the Half-Blood Prince's copy of Advanced Potion-Making for a new one, in order to keep the Half-Blood Prince's version. Ron also uses this spell to trim the lace off his dress robes in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.
Etymology: Latin diffindere, "to divide" or "to split".
Notes: In the Chamber of Secrets video game, it is mentioned that Diffindo cuts (or severs) things that are organic (carbon-based) in origin. However, it must be noted that the video games should not be taken as canon.

Dissendium
Pronunciation: dis-SEND-ee-um /dɪsɛ'ndiʊm/
Description: Causes the statue of the humpbacked witch hiding the secret passage to Honeydukes to open up.
Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.
Etymology: The english word "dissident" meaning to be against the laws.
Notes: This is probably not a spell in the strict sense, but a magical password like "Mimbulus Mimbletonia" (once a password for the Fat Lady) and "Acid Pops" (password for Dumbledore's office gargoyle in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince).

(Disillusionment Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Causes the target to become able to change colour to match their background, effectively hiding them without making them invisible.
Seen/Mentioned: Alastor Moody uses the charm on Harry Potter in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Also mentioned in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince in the Ministry of Magic leaflet provided to all Magical people as a precaution against Voldemort's reign of terror.

Drought Charm
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Dries up a limited amount of water
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Engorgio (The Engorgement Charm)
Pronunciation: en-GOR-jee-oh /ɛngordʒio/
Description: Makes something grow larger.
Seen/Mentioned: Seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when the imposter Professor Moody casts it on a spider to enhance a demonstration of the effects of the Cruciatus Curse. Hagrid is also suspected of performing the charm on his pumpkins once, and it is even speculated to be the cause of Hagrid's abnormal size before it is revealed he is a half-giant.
Etymology: The English word engorged means "distended" or "swollen".

Enlargement Charm
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Causes object to swell in size; similar to the Engorgement Charm.

Rennervate
Pronunciation: EN-er-VAH-tay /ɛ,nɚva'te/
Description: An "awakening" spell.
Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Amos Diggory uses it to wake up Winky, while later Professor Dumbledore uses it to wake up Viktor Krum. Dumbledore also used this spell to wake Barty Crouch Jr. to prepare him for questioning. In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Harry uses it in an attempt to wake Professor Dumbledore.
Etymology: Perhaps from English en- (in the sense of "in") and either English nerve or Latin nervus, both in the sense of "force" or "power". There are no English or Latin words with both similar spelling and similar meaning, although the spelling is nearly identical to enervate, which means weaken or unnerve. It could also be a reference to the English word, energise.
Notes: Can be used to counter the effects of the Stupefy spell.

Entrail-Expelling Curse
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Probably involves expelling entrails. Invented by Urquhart Rackharrow, 1612 1697.

Entrancing Enchantment
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Entrances the person the spell is cast upon.

Episkey (Healing Spell)
Pronunciation: eh-PIS-key /ɛpɪ'ski/
Description: Used to heal relatively minor injuries.
Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire after the first task of the Triwizard Tournament. In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Nymphadora Tonks uses this spell to fix Harry's broken nose; also used by Harry in the same book to fix Demelza Robins' mouth.
Etymology: The word comes from the Greek "episkeui" (""), which means "repair".
Notes: J. K. Rowling writes in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince that Harry's knowledge tells him this spell could belong to a family (or variety) of Healing Spells, in the same way a species of plants belongs to a larger genus.

Evanesco (The Vanishing Spell)
Pronunciation: eh-ven-ES-ko /ɛ,vənɛ'sko/ or ee-vah-NESS-koh
Description: Makes something vanish.
Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix when Professor Snape makes Harry's Draught of Peace disappear from his cauldron. Also when Fred and George are showing off their puking pasties, Lee Jordan cleared the bucket of vomit with the Evanesco spell.
Etymology: Latin evanescere, "to disappear".
Notes: In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Bill Weasley uses the spell to cause some scrolls belonging to the Order of the Phoenix to vanish. Presumably, objects banished this way can be made to reappear, as Bill probably expected to recover the scrolls later.
Notes2: The incantation most likely to be used to get the object back is the incantation: Inanimatus Conjurus. This is suggested in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.

Expecto Patronum (The Patronus Charm)
Pronunciation: ex-SPEC-to pa-TRONE-um /ɛkspɛ'kto patro'nʊm/
Description: The Patronus Charm is a defensive spell, used to conjure an incarnation of the Witch's or Wizard's innermost positive emotions, to act as a protector.
Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, when Remus Lupin made the Dementor on the train disappear, though seen without the incantation noticed. Seen again when Lupin teaches Harry Potter to use the charm as a defence against Dementors. Later seen at the beginning of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix when Harry uses it while being attacked by a Dementor with Dudley.
Etymology: See Patronus Charm article.
Notes: The Patronus Charm is complex enough in its uses, effects, and implications as to merit its own article.

Expelliarmus (The Disarming Charm)
Pronunciation: ex-PEL-lee-AR-mus /ɛkspɛ'liarmʊs/ (British /ɛkspɛ'liarmʊs/)
Description: This spell is used to disarm another wizard, typically by causing the victim's wand to fly out of reach. It also throws the wizard backwards a few feet when enough power is placed behind it. As demonstrated in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, simultaneous use of this spell by multiple witches or wizards on a single person can throw the wizard back more powerfully.
Seen/Mentioned: First seen in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, when Professor Snape disarms Professor Lockhart in the Duelling Club. Also used by Harry in the same book to retrieve Riddle's diary from Malfoy, to free Ron from the giant spider (Acromantula), and in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry, Ron, and Hermione all use it at the same time to produce the bizarre effect of stunning Professor Snape. In the Goblet of Fire movie, it is somehow used by Cedric Diggory to disarm Viktor Krum (who was under the Imperius Curse) during the third event, and by Harry Potter to Lord Voldemort during their duel in the graveyard (initiating the Priori Incantatem effect). Again it is used in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, when Draco Malfoy disarms Professor Dumbledore.
Etymology: Perhaps an incorrect form of the Latin expellere ("-armus", might come from the English "arm", as in "weapon", with -us being a latinized ending), since Jk. Rowling lived in Portugal it is possible that "armus" derives from the portuguese word "arma" meaning weapon, thus making "expel his weapon".
Notes: When duelling in the Prisoner of Azkaban video game, Expelliarmus can be used as a shield, much like the Protego charm. When used in the Chamber of Secrets video game, it can make a spell backfire.
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(False Memory Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Implants a false memory in the mind of the target.
Seen/Mentioned: Tom Riddle uses this against Morfin Gaunt and Hepzibah Smith's house-elf in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince to make them confess to murders he himself committed.

(Featherweight Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Makes something lightweight.
Seen/Mentioned: Harry contemplates using this in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban to lighten his trunk so that he can carry it by broom to Hogwarts. Before he uses it, however, he accidentally summons the Knight Bus.

Ferula
Pronunciation: fair-OO-lah /fɛ'rulə/
Description: Creates a bandage and a splint.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Remus Lupin in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban to bind Ron's broken leg.
Etymology: Latin ferula, meaning "walking-stick" or "splint".

(Fidelius Charm)
Pronunciation: Possibly "Fidelio" (Fi-DAY-lee-o), although repeated references to it as a 'complicated charm' suggest that it might require more than just the one word, perhaps something similar to the ritual involved in the Unbreakable Vow.
Description: This complex charm enables secret information to be hidden within the soul of the recipient, known as a Secret-Keeper. The information is then irretrievable until and unless the Secret-Keeper chooses to reveal it; not even those who have the secret revealed to them can reveal it to others.
Seen/Mentioned: So far, there have been two uses of the Fidelius Charm in the Harry Potter series:
In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, it is explained that when Harry was an infant, he and his parents, James and Lily Potter, were hidden from Lord Voldemort by this charm. They initially selected Sirius Black to be their Secret-Keeper, but Black recommended that they choose Peter Pettigrew instead. When they did, Pettigrew betrayed them to Voldemort (and framed Sirius for doing so, as well as for Pettigrew's own murder).
In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix we are told the charm is also used to hide the location of the headquarters for the Order of the Phoenix. Albus Dumbledore is the Secret-Keeper, and is apparently able to use a letter to reveal the information to Harry.
Etymology: Latin fidelis, which means "faithful" or "loyal".
Notes: J. K. Rowling has stated that when a Secret-Keeper dies the secret they held can never be revealed to anyone else; the people who were told about the secret before the Secret-Keeper's death will still know the secret, but they will still be unable to reveal the secret to other people even after the death of the Secret-Keeper.
Notes (2): The Fidelius Charm seems to have no effect with regard to animals, as Hedwig found Ron and Hermione in the headquarters of the Order of the Phoenix in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (unless she was told by Dumbledore somehow). It is therefore possible that Nagini, Voldemort's snake, could infiltrate The Order's HQ, whilst possessed by Voldemort.

Finite Incantatem
Pronunciation: fi-NEE-tay in-can-TAH-tem /fɪni'te ɪnkanta'tʊm/
Description: Negates spells or the effects of spells.
Seen/Mentioned: Professor Snape uses it in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets to restore order in the Duelling Club when Harry and Draco were duelling. Remus Lupin uses the short form "Finite" in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix as well. Also used in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix when Lupin stops Neville's legs from shaking.
Etymology: Latin finire, "to finish". Incantatem is obviously intended to recall "incantation"; the Latin verb form incantatum would mean "someone or something enspelled".
Notes: In the Chamber of Secrets movie, Hermione uses it to stop the "rogue Bludger" sent by Dobby from attacking Harry.

Flagrate
Pronunciation: flag-RAH-tay /flagra'te/
Description: With this spell, the caster's wand can leave fiery marks.
Seen/Mentioned: Single appearance, by Hermione in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. She used the spell to identify doors of the Department of Mysteries which members of Dumbledore's Army had already opened, by marking an "X" on them. It is also possible that the Tom Riddle that emerged from Riddle's Diary used a non-verbal incantation of this spell to leave his name "Tom Marvolo Riddle" in the air, whilst proving to Harry that he was Lord Voldemort in the Chamber of Secrets.
Etymology: The incantation comes from the Latin verb flagrare, meaning "to burn".
Notes: Hermione uses the charm to mark an "X" on the chosen doors.

(Flame-Freezing Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Causes fire to become harmless to those caught in it, creating only a gentle, tickling sensation instead of burns.
Seen/Mentioned: Mentioned in the first chapter of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban as used by witches and wizards during medieval burnings. Apparently, one witch (Wendelin the Weird) was so fond of the tickling sensation she allowed herself to be caught and subsequently burned 47 times.
Notes: This may have been the spell used by Albus Dumbledore in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince to seemingly set fire to Tom Riddle's old wardrobe whilst causing no physical damage. This may also be the source of the pigmented fire in the way of Harry in the race to get the philosopher's stone.

Freezing Charm
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Freezes objects.
Notes: Possibly related to the Glacius spell found in the Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban video game

Furnunculus
Pronunciation: fur-NUNG-cu-lus /fərnʊ'kʊkulʊs/
Description: Makes boils appear on the victim.
Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Harry and Draco Malfoy get in a fight and Harry hits Gregory Goyle accidentally. Later, on the return journey of the Hogwarts Express, Harry casts this spell on Vincent Crabbe while George Weasley casts the Jelly-Legs Jinx; however, the mixture causes little tentacles to sprout all over Crabbe's face.
Etymology: The English word Furunculus means to cover with boils.
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Mr.Kitahori - January 4, 2008 01:01 AM (GMT)
Growth Charm
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Causes an object to grow larger.
Note: Almost certainly the same spell as "Engorgio".

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Hair-Thickening Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Thickens one's hair.

(Hex Deflection)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Deflects spells. It seems to be similar to a Shield Charm, although deflection does not cause the spell to rebound on the attacker.
Seen/Mentioned: Professor Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is mentioned to have given the class a lesson in it. Although it could be speculated to not be a spell at all, and to mearly refer to the subject of stopping hexes in any number of ways.

(Homorphus Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Causes an Animagus or transfigured object to reassume its normal shape.
Seen/Mentioned: According to Gilderoy Lockhart, he used it to force a Werewolf to take its human form (Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets). However, it is extremely unlikely that this is possible, otherwise such a spell would have been used on Remus Lupin when he transformed into a werewolf. It may also have been used by Sirius Black and Remus Lupin in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, non-verbally, to force Peter Pettigrew to assume his human form. In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire this charm was a counter-spell to the Transfiguration Spell.
Etymology: Most likely from Latin homo, "a human", and Greek morph (μορφή), "shape".

(Horcrux Spell)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: This spell allows a part of a wizard's soul to pass into an object, thereby making the object a Horcrux. One has to commit murder and take advantage of the soul's "splitting apart" by this most evil deed in order to be able to perform this spell, and it is probably very complex.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Lord Voldemort while creating his Horcruxes. First mentioned in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

(Hot Air Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Causes wand to emit hot air.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Hermione Granger in The Order of the Phoenix to dry off her robes. Also used shortly after to melt snow.
Notes: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince suggests that the Hot Air Charm can be nonverbal, and only requires a complicated wand movement to be cast successfully.

(Hurling Hex)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Causes brooms to vibrate violently in the air and try to buck their rider off.
Seen/Mentioned: Professor Quirrell may have been casting a wordless and wandless magic version of this spell in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone on Harry's broom during his Quidditch match. Professor Flitwick suggested that Harry's confiscated Firebolt may be jinxed with this spell.
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(Impenetrable Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown (Note: this could be the title for Impervius; the two charms seem to have the same effect.)
Description: Makes objects such as doors impenetrable (by everything, including sounds and objects).
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Mrs Weasley in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix on the door of the room where an Order of the Phoenix meeting was being held, in order to prevent her sons, Fred and George, from eavesdropping. The spell is also used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by Hermione to trap Rita Skeeter within a bottle while she was in beetle form.

Impedimenta (The Impediment Jinx)
Pronunciation: im-PED-i-MEN-tuh /ɪmpɛ,dɪmɛ'ntə/
Description: This hex is capable of tripping, freezing, binding, knocking back and generally impeding the target's progress towards the caster. The extent to which the spell's specific action can be controlled by the caster is unclear.
Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Harry is practising for the third task. Also seen toward the end of Harry Potter and the Order of the Pheonix, when Harry is fighting the Death Eaters. Stronger uses of this spell seem capable of blowing targets away; also used in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix in a DA meeting, and in the same book by Madam Hooch to blast Harry off of Draco Malfoy when they get into a fist fight after the Quidditch match when Malfoy was insulting Harry's parents.
Etymology: Latin impedimentum (plural impedimenta), "a hindrance" or "an impediment".

Imperio (The Imperius Curse)
See The Unforgivable Curses in the world of Harry Potter for more detailed information.
Pronunciation: im-PEER-ee-oh /ɪmperio/
Description: One of the three "Unforgivable Curses". Causes the recipient of the curse to do the unquestioned bidding of the caster, although those who are strong willed may learn to resist it.
Seen/Mentioned: Many places. Seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Barty Crouch Jr., who was impersonating ex-Auror Alastor "Mad-Eye" Moody, used it on a spider-like creature as a "class demonstration" in a Defence Against the Dark Arts lecture. Madam Rosemerta is under the curse in the sixth book.

Impervius
Pronunciation: im-PER-vi-ous /ɪmpɚ'viʊs/
Description: This spell makes something repel (literally, become impervious to) water (perhaps other substances as well).
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Hermione in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban on Harry's glasses while in a Quidditch match and also by the Gryffindor Quidditch team in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, both times to allow team members to see in a driving rain.
Etymology: It is said that the Latin impervius means (and is the source of) "impervious"; although it is the source of the word, it is better translated as inpassable, as in a mountain peak.

Incarcerous
Pronunciation: in-CAR-ser-us /ɪnkar'sər̩s/
Description: Ties someone or something up with ropes.
Seen/Mentioned: First heard in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, when Dolores Umbridge gets in a battle with the centaurs.
Etymology: Probably English incarcerate, "to imprison".
Notes: A non-verbal version of this spell may have been used to tie up Peter Pettigrew in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. It may also have been used by Quirrell near the end of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, although he is said to have merely "snapped his fingers". Also seen (non-canonically) in the Harry Potter Trading Card Game.

Incendio
Pronunciation: in-SEND-ee-oh /ɪnsɛn'dio/
Description: Produces fire(or as it is usually described, blue flames).
Seen/Mentioned: Used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by Arthur Weasley to create a fire in the Dursleys' hearth so that he could use Floo powder there. In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, this spell is used several times in battle.
Etymology: Probably a blend of Latin incendium, "a fire", and incendere, "to set fire to".
Notes: In the Philosopher's Stone video game, this spell is used to temporarily stun dangerous plants.

(Inflation Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Causes someone to blow up like a balloon and fly away.
Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry inadvertently uses this charm to make his aunt Marge blow up and float to the ceiling.
Etymology: English "inflate", to blow up (as a balloon).

Intruder Charm
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: Detects intruders and sounds an alarm.
Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Professor Umbridge casts this around her office.
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Mr.Kitahori - January 4, 2008 01:02 AM (GMT)
(Jelly-Legs Jinx)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: The victim's legs wobble uncontrollably, in a jelly-like fashion, a dance rather.
Seen/Mentioned: Used on Malfoy, Crabbe and Goyle in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. In the same book, Hermione uses the spell to help Harry learn the Shield Charm.
Notes: When Fred Weasley uses this spell on Vincent Crabbe in the end of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry used the Furnunculus spell at the same time, causing strange tentacles to sprout of Crabbe's face.
(Possibly the name of the Tarrantelegra Curse)

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Langlock
Pronunciation: LANG-lock /lŋ'lɑk/
Description: Glues the subject's tongue to the roof of their mouth. Created by the Half-Blood Prince.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Harry on Peeves in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and also on Argus Filch to general applause.
Etymology: Probably from the French langue ("tongue") and the English "lock".
Notes: It has been said by Rowling that Peeves is a Poltergeist, and, since these are corporeal, in her own words: how else could he chew gum or cause mischief? Thus Peeves is corporeal; presumably the spell can only be used on entities with physical speech apparatus (thus, not on ghosts).

Legilimens (Legilimency Spell)
Pronunciation: Leg-IL-im-ens
Description: Allows the caster to delve into the mind of the victim, allowing the caster to see memories and emotions.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Snape on Harry during Occlumency lessons in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Etymology: Latin mens ("mind") and legere ("to read").

Levicorpus
Pronunciation: Lev-i-CORE-pus
Description: the victim is dangled upside-down by their ankles, sometimes accompanied by a flash of light (this may be a variant of the spell).
Seen/Mentioned: Apparently invented by the Half-Blood Prince, and described by him as "non-verbal", although it can be used verbally. Harry Potter learns it by reading notes written by the Half-Blood Prince. The previous year, Harry had seen (through the Pensieve used by Professor Snape) his father, James Potter, use the spell against Professor Snape. It has also been used in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire during the Quidditch World Cup.
Etymology: Latin levare, "raise" + corpus, "body".

Liberacorpus
Pronunciation: LI-bear-a-CORE-pus
Description: Counteracts Levicorpus.
Seen/Mentioned: Harry uses the spell in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince to counteract the Levicorpus spell he inadvertently casts on Ron. It may also have been used earlier in the book by Nymphadora Tonks to free Harry from Draco Malfoy's Petrificus Totalus spell on the Hogwarts Express. Presumably some version was also used by Ministry of Magic employees in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire to disenchant the Muggles on whom the reconstituted Death Eaters had used Levicorpus.
Etymology: Latin liberare, "to free", + Latin corpus, "body".
Notes: It is not clear why Levicorpus has a specific counter-spell, and is not neutralized by simply using Finite Incantatem.

Locomotor
Pronunciation: LOW-co-MOW-tor /loˌkomoˈtr̩/
Description: The spell is always used with the name of a target, at which the wand is pointed (e.g. "Locomotor Trunk!"). The spell causes the named object to rise in the air and move around at the will of the caster.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Nymphadora Tonks in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix to move Harry's trunk from his room. Professor Flitwick similarly uses it to move Sybill Trelawney's trunk after Dolores Umbridge fires her. Parvati and Lavender use this spell to race their pencil cases around the edges of the table
Etymology: Latin locus (place) and movere, "to move" (past participle motus).

Locomotor Mortis (The Leg-Locker Curse)
Pronunciation: LOW-co-MOW-tor MORE-tis /loˌkomoˈtr̩ moʴˈtɪs/
Description: Locks the legs together, preventing the victim from moving the legs in any fashion.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Draco Malfoy on Neville Longbottom in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone.
Etymology: English locomotion, "movement". Latin mortis, "of death".
Notes: It is unclear whether or how this spell is related to the Locomotor spells mentioned above. It could, however, be that the curse 'locks' any part of the body in accordance to where it is pointed, or moves the body into a position of the caster's choosing whilst placing them in a state of rigor mortis. There is a possibility that Draco had pointed his wand at Neville and the curse 'locked' his legs together. It :Notes (2): In the Philosopher's Stone video game, the spell is used to stun enemies for a short period of time, while in the Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets video game, the spell is used by the Prefects and Percy Weasley if caught sneaking around at night.

Lumos
Pronunciation: LOO-moss /luˈmɒs/
Description: Creates a narrow beam of light that shines from the wand's tip, like a torch. Remus Lupin also uses it in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix to project a small flame (large enough to burn a piece of paper).
Seen/Mentioned: Constantly throughout the series.
Etymology: Latin lumen, "light".
Notes: The movies include different variations of the spell, "Lumos Solem" and "Lumos Maxima". In the Prisoner of Azkaban movie, Professor Snape's application of Lumos created a sphere of light, rather than a beam. The counter-spell is Nox. It also seems to be undetectable by the Ministry of Magic, or else ignored, as Harry Potter uses it in Prisoner of Azkaban, Goblet of Fire and Order of the Phoenix, while outside school, without consequence.

(Lupin's Light)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: A small, handheld flame.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Lupin in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. It was conjured non-verbally and possibly without a wand.
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Mobiliarbus
Pronunciation: Mow-BILL-ee-ARE-bus /mobɪˌliʴˈbʌs/
Description: Moves trees (possibly other plants as well).
Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Hermione Granger uses the spell to move a Christmas Tree in The Three Broomsticks beside her table to hide Harry Potter who had sneaked to Hogsmeade using the Marauder's Map.
Etymology: Latin mobilis, "movable" or "flexible", and arbor (alternatively arbos), "tree".

Mobilicorpus
Pronunciation: Mow-BILL-i-CORE-pus /mobɪˌlikoʴˈpʌs/
Description: Levitates and moves bodies.
Seen/Mentioned: Sirius Black uses it on Professor Snape in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Also probably used on Peter Pettigrew by Voldemort on the graveyard to make him come forward.
Etymology: Latin mobilis, "movable" + corpus, "body".
Notes: It is possible that Mobiliarbus and Mobilicorpus are variations of the same basic spell, since they share the "Mobili-" stem.

(Morfin Gaunt's Spell)
Pronunciation: Unknown; only demonstrated use is non-verbal
Description: The spell causes the victim to painfully exude large quantities of yellow pus, probably resulting from the opening of a lesion.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Morfin Gaunt to attack Bob Ogden in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. Possibly invented by Morfin. Possibly modified Furnunculus Jinx.

Morsmordre
Pronunciation: Mors-MORE-dreh /moʴzmoʴˈdrʌ/
Description: Conjures the Dark Mark.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Barty Crouch Jr. in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Also seen in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince over the castle to lure Dumbledore to his death. It was apparently invented by Lord Voldemort.
Etymology: Latin mors, "death", and mordere, meaning "to bite"; this is obviously associated with the name of Lord Voldemort's followers, the Death Eaters.
Notes: A possible translation might be "take a bite out of death" a fitting phrase for Death Eaters. Oddly, Morsmordre could be translated as "mother's murderers" in Norwegian.

Muffliato
Pronunciation: Muff-lee-AH-toe /mʊfliaˈto/
Description: This spell fills peoples' ears with an unidentifiable buzzing, to keep them from hearing nearby conversations.
Seen/Mentioned: It is used in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by Harry and Ron on various teachers and people such as Madam Pomfrey. It was created by the Half-Blood Prince.
Etymology: English muffle, "to quiet", with a pseudo-Latin or pseudo-Italian ending.

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Nox
Pronunciation: Noks /noks/
Description: Turns off the light produced by the Lumos spell.
Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry and Hermione used this spell to turn off their wand-lights in the Shrieking Shack.
Etymology: Latin nox, "night".
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Obliteration Charm)
Pronunciation: Unknown
Description: A general description cannot be given, see below.
Seen/Mentioned: Used by Hermione Granger in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix to remove the footprints that she, Harry, and Ron left in the snow.
Notes: The above instance in book five only reveals that the Obliteration Charm can remove footprints. There is no explanation as to what effect this has on other things.

Obliviate (The Memory Charm)
Pronunciation: oh-BLIV-ee-AH-tay /oblɪˌviaˈte/
Description: Used to remove or perhaps alter the subject's memories of an event.
Seen/Mentioned: First used in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by Gilderoy Lockhart on Harry and Ron; the spell backfired due to a faulty wand, causing Lockhart to lose most of his own memory.
Etymology: Latin oblivisci, "forget". The spell is most often used against Muggles who have seen something of the wizarding world.
Notes: The Ministry of Magic employees assigned to modifying the memories of Muggles are called Obliviators. The charm can be broken by powerful magic, or extreme duress, as Lord Voldemort was able to torture Bertha Jorkins into remembering details that Barty Crouch Sr. had forced her to forget using the charm.

Oppugno
Pronunciation: oh-PUG-no /ɒpʊˈgno/
Description: Apparently causes animals or beings of lesser intelligence to attack.
Seen/Mentioned: By Hermione Granger in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, to attack Ron Weasley with a summoned flock of canaries during a spat.
Etymology: Latin oppugno, "I attack."

Orchideous
Pronunciation: or-KID-ee-us /oʴkɪˈdiəs/
Description: Makes a bouquet of flowers appear out of the caster's wand.
Seen/Mentioned: In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by Mr Ollivander to test Fleur Delacour's wand. Also used in the Goblet of Fire video game as an offensive spell (reduces enemies to bundles of flowers).
Etymology: English orchid and Latin suffix -eous, "of or bearing (the root word)". Another possibility is a portmanteau of orchid and hideous.





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